Thursday, May 24, 2018

Timber Rafting on the Ottawa Plaque

In Arnprior, Ontario, to get to the plaque commemorating timber rafting on the Ottawa River go to the conjunction of Riverview Drive and McLean Avenue, go west on narrow and unpaved Leo Lavoie Road and keep to the right to almost the end, then make your way from there to the furthest point west where the Madawaska River flows into the Ottawa River. There stands the plaque.






TIMBER RAFTING ON THE OTTAWA

The rafting of square timber down the Ottawa River, begun in 1806, reached its peak during 1861-91 and ended in 1909. Pine "sticks" from one to two feet square and 40 to 50 feet long were floated down tributary rivers such as the Petawawa, Madawaska, Bonnechere and Mississippi to rafting points on the Ottawa. There "cribs" were made up, containing 20 to 40 pieces of timber, and as many as 200 cribs were taken in turn assembled into a raft. These rafts could be taken apart for passage down rapids or the timber slides which by-passed them. Arriving at Quebec City as much as two months later, they were dismantled and the timber loaded for shipment overseas.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario



Monday, May 21, 2018

Fleet Street Pumping Station

In Ottawa, the Fleet Street pumping station occupies a location south east of the east end of Fleet Street in LeBreton Flats.








WATER WORKS
ENLARGED
1888
COMMITTEE

ALDERMAN J C. ROGER, CHAIRMAN.
ALD. G. DALGLISH. ALD. G. COX.
ALD. J. O'LEARY. ALD. S. BINGHAM.
ALD. E. G. LAVERDURE.

ROBERT SURTEES, ENGINEER
W. J. LOUGHRAN, CONTRACTOR



NATIONAL HISTORIC CIVIL ENGINEERING SITE

FLEET STREET PUMPING STATION

Originally constructed to provide a safe water supply for public use and for fire fighting purposes, this pumping station remains a lasting tribute to the prominent civil engineers responsible for its design and construction. Due to their innovative use of water power to drive the pumping equipment and superb engineering skills, the Fleet Street pumping station continues to be a key component of the City of Ottawa's water supply system.

1874-75 CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER THOMAS C. KEEFER
1888 EXPANSION CITY ENGINEER ROBERT SURTEES
1901 EXPANSION CITY ENGINEER NEWTON KER

CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING 2011



SITE HISTORIQUE NATIONAL DU GÉNIE CIVIL

POSTE DE POMPAGE DE LA RUE FLEET

Construit initialement pour assurer l'alimentaion en eau potable et lutter contre les incendies, ce poste de pompage demeure un hommage aux éminents ingénieurs civils qui en ont assuré la conception et la construction. Le poste utilise de façon novatrice la force hydraulique pour actionner les équipements de pompage. Le poste de pompage de la rue Fleet est demeuré un élément essentiel du système d'approvisionnement en eau de la ville d'Ottawa.

THOMAS C. KEEFER INGÉNIEUR CONSTRUIT EN 1874-75
ROBERT SURTEES INGÉNIEUR MUNICIPAL EXPANSION EN 1888
NEWTON KER INGÉNIEUR MUNICIPAL EXPANSION EN 1901

2011 LA SOCIÉTÉ CANADIENNE DE GÉNIE CIVIL























Thursday, May 17, 2018

Gillies Bros. Lumbering Firm Plaque

On the north side of Usborne Street about halfway from where Usborne connects to River Road in Arnprior, Ontario, to where it connects to River Road in Braeside, Ontario, stands the plaque commemorating Gillies Brothers Lumbering Firm.





GILLIES BROS. LUMBERING FIRM

This firm was begun in 1873 when James, William, John and David Gillies purchased a sawmill here on the Ottawa River at Braeside. Building on the experience acquired by their father, John Gillies, who had begun lumbering in Lanark County in 1842, the had established themselves by the mid-1880's as one of the Ottawa Valley's large lumber producers. This position was maintained partly by the involvement of succeeding generations in the management of the firm and by careful acquisition and exploitation of timber limits. In the twentieth century, despite the exhaustion of stands of virgin pine and pressures to diversify, Gillies continued almost exclusively to manufacture pine. In 1963 the firm was sold to Consolidated Paper Corporation, ending 90 years of family ownership.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture and Recreation




Monday, May 14, 2018

The Gather-Ring - Tedibà Màmandosewin - Le Rondeau

In Ottawa the Gather-Ring occupies a place to the east of the the south end of Portage Bridge, just north of Wellington Street.




Tedibà Màmandosewin

MANUEL A. BÁEZ ASHIDJ CHARLYNNE LAFONTAINE

Iyo Tedibà Màmandosewin kì iji kìjenindàgwad nìj kechi apìtenindagwakin Anishinàbewiziwining, Mitigog kaye Wejibàbandamowini Nakwebidjigan.

Mitigog kàgige kì bi kàtiniganiwiwag akìng Kanadàng ejinkàdeg, kà ondji màdjiseg ogog mitigog ogì kanawenindànawàn kidàdisòkàninàn weshkad kà bi ijiwebag. Wejibàbandamowini Nakwebidjiganag nitàwitìwin odayànàwà kidji odàpinamowàdj wenishishing inenindàmàwinan, wà iji mino ijichigen, kaye mamàndàwinamowining, kidji wìdokàgoyen ondje pàdjimosemagak.

Owa Mitig, tibàdidàgoze wàwiyeyàng kìjikiwidk, ashidj Wejibàbanamowini Nakwebidjigan, kaye wewàwiyeyàg ishpiming, màmawosin ondje kàkina iwag pemàdizidijig obimàdjiwowiniwà meshkodonimowàdj, odàdisòkàniwàn, ànimitàgoziwin kaye wàbandamowin.

Màmìwininiwag odanamikànàwà iyo Tedibà Màmandosewin wayeshkad odakìwàng.

Iyo Tedibà Màmandosewin kà ojitòdj ombàkonigan
Manuel A. Báez (New York) ashidj
Charlynne Lafontiane (kà mazinabìhang).

canada.pch.gc.ca

Wìyagi kwenàdjiwichigan Odàwàng kagwedjitònàniwan kidji wàbadahiwàniwang Kanadàng onje kakine pemàdizidjig wàkàhi.





The Gather-Ring

MANUEL A. BÁEZ ASHIDJ CHARLYNNE LAFONTAINE

The Gather-Ring is inspired by two iconic symbols deeply rooted in indigenous traditions, the Tree and the Dream Catcher.

Trees have always played a vital role across the land on which Canada was founded, bearing witness to our histories. Dream Catchers have the power to capture our positive thoughts, dreams, and visions, offering to lead us towards a bright future.

The Tree represented here by the circular cedar base, and the Dream Catcher, by the patterned canopy and ring above, are both brought together within The Gather-Ring as a way of evoking diverse cultural exchange, storytelling, discussion and reflection.

The Algonquin people welcome The Gather-Ring on their ancestral land.

The Gather-Ring is an installation created by Manuel A. Báez (Designer, Architect (New York)) and Charlynne Lafontaine (Artist).

canada.pch.gc.ca

The Art in the Capital program aims to raise the profile of Canadian public art in the urban spaces of Canada's Capital Region.




Le Rondeau

MANUEL A. BÁEZ ASHIDJ CHARLYNNE LAFONTAINE

Le Rondeau s'inspire de deux symboles emblématiques profondément ancrés dans les traditions autochtones : l'Arbre et le Capteur de rêves.

Les arbres ont toujours joué un rôle essentiel sur le territoire sur lequel a été fondé le Canada, agissant comme témoins de notre histoire. Les capteurs de rêves ont le pouvoir de saisir nos pensées positives, nos rêves et nos visions, offrant de nous conduire vers un avenir prometteur.

L'Arbre, représenté ici par la base circulaire en cèdre, et le Capteur de rêves par l'auvent à motifs et l'anneau au-dessus, sont réunis dans Le Rondeau, évoquant ainsi les différentes interprétations culturelles et offre un cercle symbolique pour les échanges culturels, les histoires, la discussion et la réflexion.

Le peuple algonquin accueille sur ses terres ancestrales Le Rondeau.

Le Rondeau est une installation créée par Manuel A. Báez (designer, architecte (New York)) et Charlynne Lafontaine (artiste).

canada.pch.gc.ca

La programme Art dans la capitale vise à accroître la visibilité de l'art public canadien dans l'espace urbain de la région de la capitale du Canada.